The Art Of Jose Dávila

View all 6 Photos

Originally trained as an architect but keeping art as his first love, Mexican artist Jose Dávila began dabbling in photography and artistic projects during breaks from his studies. After exhibiting a series of black and white photographs and founding an art collective with friends, he created his first sculptural work in 1999 for a group show. The conceptual piece featured 200 miniature buildings reminiscent of government housing arranged in a simple geometric pattern. Architecture and abstract art flavored with a dash of social and political activism.

Dávila saw architecture and art as intrinsically connected. This concept runs through all of his work, along with a strong interest for highlighting the relationship between gravity and humanity and a desire to explore “the use and occupation of space.” In many artworks, whether sculptures, photographs or mixed-media installations, the artist also reflects on the failures of modernist architecture and the way the modernist movement has transformed over the years. “There is something poetic in failure and in our limitations, because we live with a modernism that is not preserved, where we see buildings that have abandoned or demolished and others have been badly remodeled,” he says.

Using natural and building materials as well as found objects, Jose Dávila creates large scale, site-specific sculptures and installations. A large slab of marble stands in an upright position, held by colored straps. Natural stone slabs, one boasting undulating edges, the other clean lines, hold a piece of smoked glass in place. Juxtaposing materials create a powerful moment of tension, accentuating the contrast between solidity and fragility. Geometry, art history and architecture come together in thought-provoking artworks that challenge and engage the viewer. Photo credits: Jose Dávila.

Featured Products Explore new arrivals at the Gessato Shop

Take me there

  • Zallinger Refuge

    A thoughtful renovation and expansion of historical buildings in the Alps. Dating back to the…

  • Dá Licença Hotel In Portugal

    One-of-a-kind, this retreat celebrates the heritage and culture of Alentejo. During their travels, Vitor Borges…

  • The Wuyuan Skywells Hotel

    A 300-year-old traditional Chinese building transformed into a high-end hotel. Nestled in the Yan village…

  • Design Destination: Melbourne

    A complete travel guide to Melbourne, your next design destination. The cultural capital of Australia,…

More for you

                array(5) {
  ["post__not_in"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    int(181609)
  }
  ["tag__not_in"]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(16203)
    [1]=>
    int(9208)
  }
  ["posts_per_page"]=>
  int(12)
  ["caller_get_posts"]=>
  int(1)
  ["cat"]=>
  int(16202)
}
            
  • Taping Faces By Elda Bellone

    An exploration of human features through a series of creative portraits. Following on the footsteps…

  • The Tool Cabinet of Curiosity

    A thought-provoking exploration of the meaning of craftsmanship. Created by designer Aaron Garlick, the Tool…

  • Waste Suprematism By Balazs Csizik

    A colorful photography series that looks at ocean pollution from a different perspective. As plastic…

  • Yuri Suzuki’s Furniture Music

    Transforming domestic noise pollution into relaxing soundscapes. Created by London-based sound artist and designer Yuri…

  • Cámara Catamaramétrica

    A floating pavilion on a lake in Mexico. Designed by Mexican architecture firm S-AR, Cámara…

  • Human Element By Collin Townsend Velkoff

    Conceptual sculptures that explore humanity’s reliance on nature. Multidisciplinary artist Collin Townsend Velkoff creates artworks…

  • The Jack Lamp Family

    A creative series that merges art and design. Portuguese designer and artist André Teoman makes…

  • Elda Bellone – Encoded Icons

    Finding the hidden digital world behind photographs. Born in Italy, architect, designer and artist Elda…

Close Cart