Swimmy by Ian McChesney

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You ever get the feeling that the ocean looks exactly like the sky? Whenever I look upon the vast surface of the ocean blue, there’s always a point where the water and the sky meet. Designer Ian McChesney lets us dive into the sky and experience the scaly union of  a school of fish in his innovative project called “Swimmy.” This woven sculpture is suspended over the entrance to Heddon Street in central London. It is made up of over 1,000 forks organized in the shape of a fish. It’s held up by a multitude of fine cables that gives the illusion of a floating form over the street. It was inspired by the classic children’s book Swimmy written by Leo Lionni in 1963. This incredible piece of art makes one feel as though they are experiencing the shiny patterns of  underwater creatures in the sky.

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