The Mini-Poo Emoji Sculptures By Matthew LaPenta

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Communication has constantly evolved throughout human history, but the beginning of the 21st century will probably be remembered as the emoji era. Used to convey emotion and to provide context, emojis have become indispensable for those who prefer the new language which uses visuals as a communication tool. Matthew LaPenta is an LA-based artist who creates works that explore “the impact of our constant consumption of technology, social media, and entertainment.” He’s been making emoji sculptures since 2013 and exhibited his work at the 2015 SCOPE Art Show, during Art Basel Week in Miami, Florida. Unsurprisingly, one of the most popular sculptures at the show was the beloved poop emoji, cast as a 12-inch sculpture, so Matthew LaPenta decided to make a smaller scale version that would be accessible and more affordable. The adorable 2.8 inch high and 3 inch wide sculptures will be cast in bronze with three finishes: nickel, copper, and brass. They’ll be made in two versions, polished and brushed, in a limited number of 100 each. The virtual world is thus brought to life in the form of affordable contemporary art. You can contribute to the campaign to get your hands on one of your favorite emojis immortalized in bronze, but you can also pre-order one of the 12-inch artworks from the gallery show at a reduced price. Images courtesy of Matthew LaPenta.

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