Grandma by Nico Goebel

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It was a running joke in studio that we would lasercut all of our furniture for the post-college life before we were forever locked out by the fab lab’s doors. Lasercutting isn’t at all reserved merely for large builds, but rather, its logic and precision can be used to create whimsical, elegant pieces. Nico Goebel proves this point with Grandma, a cardboard floor lamp that converts the most banal material into a work of art. An aggregate through section, the lamp capitalizes on the corrugation for a semi-porous lampshade that allows a warm glow from the light within. The slices are clipped onto an orange metal frame, a contrast to the surprising airiness of the heavy paper product.

Kimberly

Kimberly

Kimberly is a graduate from MIT's Department of Architecture, and has recently joined the publication team at MIT OpenCourseWare. While architecture remains her first love, her interests encompass literature – epic poetry and Medieval romances are her favorite – and also fashion.

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