“Juliette aux combles,” or “Juliette the attic,” is a third-floor family home in a duplex in Montreal. As the name suggests, the space originally served as a attic when the building was built in 1880. Converted by the Canadian architects L. McComber, the top floor is now a contemporary open plan design with a bookcase wrapped around the central volume. The shelves are made of aged hemlock, a warm wood that stands out against the otherwise white interior. Other remarkable details include the single plank and rope indoor swing, the balcony, and the marble-tiled shower under a tempered glass roof. Each of these elements makes the design personal and connected to the surrounding environment, truly transforming the former attic into a home.

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Holly

Holly is a poet from Kentucky. She grew up first in a Sears house, then on a farm. She studied English and Gender Studies at Mount Holyoke College and moved to Manhattan for love. As an occasional jewelry-maker and museum patron, Holly favors wearable and functional design but is eager to see work that challenges her aesthetics. Read more and connect by visiting her blog, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

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