Human Debris by Jeremy Underwood

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To Jeremy Underwood, the found object is worth a second thought. Human Debris highlights the invasion of consumerism on Houston’s waterways, but Underwood approaches this issue passive-aggressively. The sculptures that he erects out of strays plants of wood and the illuminated sea slug of plastic bottles are gentle reminders that coexist with the watery backdrop. Each sculpture’s harmonious relationship with its surroundings raises the question of why we can’t do our part to embrace the synergy as well. But for now, perhaps just appreciating Underwood’s art is a step in the right direction.

Images © Jeremy Underwoods

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Kimberly

Kimberly is a graduate from MIT's Department of Architecture, and has recently joined the publication team at MIT OpenCourseWare. While architecture remains her first love, her interests encompass literature – epic poetry and Medieval romances are her favorite – and also fashion.

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