Markéta Cajthamlova’s two-person home in Bus, Czech Republic works with the surrounding land to achieve an uncommon level of seclusion. The house sits at a village’s edge on sloping land, and Cajthamlova has placed it in such a way that no other houses are visible from the lot. The main room hosts kitchen, dining, and living furnishings, and is connected to the covered terrace—itself equipped with a hot tub and pool. The construction itself mirrors that sense of functional fluency; red cedar and concrete details are particularly common.

via

    string(5) "Janet"

Janet

Janet is a senior at Kenyon College studying English with a Creative Writing emphasis. She has a particular affinity for American literature, and enjoys discovering the narrative(s) behind a piece of art. GBlog is her blogging debut, and she is grateful for newfound exposure to objects such as the “Bug Light.” (She favors the stately praying mantis.)

Tags: ,
    • Upper West Side Residence

      Architecture

      A beautifully renovated, prewar “Classic Six” apartment in NYC. Located above the Natural History Museum…

    • Apartment Tibbaut

      Architecture

      A creatively designed home in a building with traditional vaulted ceilings and stone pillars. Located…

    • Casa de Madera

      Architecture

      An experimental house design that proposes a more sustainable approach to urban development. Designed by…

    • Garden Lane House

      Architecture

      The restoration and expansion of a 19th century terraced house in Melbourne. Named Garden Lane…

    • House in Reggio Emilia

      Architecture

      A 1950s house redesigned for modern living with bright spaces that open to a wraparound…

    • Friha

      Architecture

      A sustainable vacation retreat in the Southern Black Forest, Germany. With sustainable travel becoming increasingly…

loader